Difference between revisions of "Brown Bag Lunch Schedule"

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Revision as of 18:53, 2 February 2017

The HCIL has an open, semi-organized weekly "brown bag lunch (BBL)" every Thursdays from 12:30-1:30pm in HCIL (2105 Hornbake, South Wing). The topics range from someone's work, current interests in the HCIL, software demos/reviews, study design, proposed research topics, introductions to new people, etc. The BBL is the one hour a week where we all come together--thus, it’s a unique time for HCIL members with unique opportunities to help build collaborations, increase awareness of each other’s activities, and generally just have a bit of fun together. There is no RSVP; simply show up!

If you would like to give or suggest a talk, presentation, workshop, etc., send an email to BBL student co-coordinators Deokgun Park (intuinno@umd.edu) or Rebecca Stone (rstone1@umd.edu). In the email, briefly describe the topic and preferred dates.

To be notified about upcoming events, please subscribe one of these mailing lists.

We thank YAHOO for its past sponsorship of the HCIL Brown Bag Lunches Yahoo.jpg.

Spring 2017 Schedule

Date Leader Topic
02/02/2017

Kickoff to a new Semester!

Come network, make introductions, and share what each of us is working on

Please come to our first BBL of the spring 2017 semester to introduce yourself and share what you're working on in the coming semester. The first BBL will be for us to network with each other and kickoff a great new semester.

02/09/2017

Bilge Mutlu,
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Human-Centered Principles and Methods for Designing Robotic Technologies

Abstract: The increasing emergence of robotic technologies that serve as automated tools, assistants, and collaborators promises tremendous benefits in everyday settings from the home to manufacturing facilities. While these technologies promise interactions that can be highly complex and beneficial, their successful integration into the human environment ultimately requires these interactions to also be natural and intuitive. To achieve complex but intuitive interactions, designers and developers must simultaneously understand and address human and computational challenges. In this talk, I will present my group’s work on building human-centered guidelines, methods, and tools to address these challenges in order to facilitate the design of robotic technologies that are more effective, intuitive, acceptable, and even enjoyable through successful integration into the human environment. The first part of the talk will review a series of projects that will demonstrate how the marrying of knowledge about people and computational methods through a systematic design process can enable effective user interactions with social, assistive, and telepresence robots. The second part of the talk will cover ongoing work that provides designers and developers with tools to apply these guidelines to the development of real-world robotic technologies and that utilizes partnerships with domain experts and end users to ensure the successful integration of these technologies into everyday settings. The talk will conclude with a discussion of high-level design guidelines that can be drawn from this body of work.

Bio: Bilge Mutlu is an associate professor of computer science, psychology, and industrial engineering at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He received his Ph.D. degree from Carnegie Mellon University's Human-Computer Interaction Institute in 2009. His background combines training in interaction design, human-computer interaction, and robotics with industry experience in product design and development. Dr. Mutlu is a former Fulbright Scholar and the recipient of the NSF CAREER award as well as several best paper awards and nominations, including HRI 2008, HRI 2009, HRI 2011, UbiComp 2013, IVA 2013, RSS 2013, HRI 2014, CHI 2015, and ASHA 2015. His research has been covered by national and international press including the NewScientist, MIT Technology Review, Discovery News, Science Nation, and Voice of America. He has served in the Steering Committee of the HRI Conference and the Editorial Board of IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing, co-chairing the Program Committees for ROMAN 2016, HRI 2015, ROMAN 2015, and ICSR 2011, the Program Sub-committees on Design for CHI 2013 and CHI 2014, and the organizing committee for HRI 2017. More information on Dr. Mutlu and his research can be found at http://bilgemutlu.com and http://hci.cs.wisc.edu.


02/16/2017

Susan Winter,
University of Maryland, College Park

TBD

TBD

02/23/2017

Virginia Byrne,
University of Maryland, College Park
& TBA

TBD

TBD

03/02/2017

Gary M. Jackson

Predicting Malicious Behavior

TBD

03/09/2017

Tim Summers & Sanjna Srivatsa,
University of Maryland, College Park

TBD

TBD

03/16/2017

Raja Kushalnagar,
Gallaudet University

Multimedia for Deaf Eyes: How do we make multimedia accessible for deaf and hard of hearing people?

Abstract: TBA

Bio: Raja Kushalnagar is the Director of the Information Technology program in the Department of Science, Technology and Mathematics at Gallaudet University in Washington, DC.

His research interests encompass the fields of accessible computing and accessibility/intellectual property law, with the goal of improving access to multimodal information for deaf and hard of hearing (deaf) individuals. In the accessible computing field, he investigates how deaf individuals use aural-to-visual access such as speech-to-text or sign language interpreters and on multimodal access disparities between hearing and deaf. He also develops accessible computing solutions to address these disparities in multimodal information access. In the accessibility/intellectual property law field, he advocates for updates in accessible and intellectual property law, to incorporate accessible computing advances such as captioning/subtitling.

He worked in industry for over five years before returning to academia and disability law policy. Towards that end, he completed a J.D. and LL.M. in disability law, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science. He served on the Federal Communications Commission’s Consumer Advocacy Commission. He has published several peer-reviewed publications and received grants in the fields of accessible computing, accessible law and intellectual property law. He can be reached at raja.kushalnagar@gallaudet.edu

03/23/2017 No Brown Bag, Spring Break.
03/30/2017

Dion Goh

TBD

TBD

04/06/2017

Allison Druin
University of Maryland, College Park

An Information Activist, National Parks, and a Digital Future

TBD


04/13/2017

Daniel Votipka
University of Maryland, College Park

Who is Mr. Robot?: A Study of the Humans Behind Software Vulnerability Discovery (Working Title)

TBD

04/20/2017

Rebecca Stone
University of Maryland, College Park

Cultural understanding (or impact), proof of concept and Agile teams

TBD

04/27/2017

TBD

CHI Papers Clinic

TBD

05/04/2017

TBD

CHI Papers Clinic

TBD

Past Brown Bags

View the Past Brown Bag Lunch Schedules to learn more about prior talks.