Difference between revisions of "Brown Bag Lunch Schedule"

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(Updated schedule)
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| '''Elissa Redmiles''' <br>HCIL, University of Maryland, College Park
 
| '''Elissa Redmiles''' <br>HCIL, University of Maryland, College Park
 
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'''How I Learned to be Secure: a Census-Representative Survey of Security Advice Sources and Behavior'''
 
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'''Abstract:''' Few users have a single, authoritative, source from whom they can request digital-security advice. Rather, digital- security skills are often learned haphazardly, as users filter through an overwhelming quantity of security advice. By understanding the factors that contribute to users' advice sources, beliefs, and security behaviors, we can help to pare down the quantity and improve the quality of advice provided to users, streamlining the process of learning key behaviors. In this work we rigorously investigated how users' security beliefs, knowledge, and demographics correlate with their sources of security advice, and how all these factors influence security behaviors. Using a carefully pre-tested, U.S.-census-representative survey of 526 users, we present an overview of the prevalence of respondents' advice sources, reasons for accepting and rejecting advice from those sources, and the impact of these sources and demographic factors on security behavior. We find evidence of a "digital divide" in security: the advice sources of users with higher skill levels and socioeconomic status dier from those with fewer resources. This digital security divide may add to the vulnerability of already disadvantaged users. We conclude with recommendations for combating the digital divide and improving the efficacy of digital-security advice.
 
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'''Bio:''' TBD
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'''Bio:''' Elissa Redmiles is a Ph.D. student in Computer Science at the University of Maryland. Her research focuses on usable security - the intersection between Cyber-security and Human Computer Interaction. Elissa was a 2015 Eric and Wendy Schmidt Data Science for Social Good Fellow at the University of Chicago. Prior to pursuing her Ph.D., she held Marketing Management and Software Engineering roles at IBM and completed her B.S. in Computer Science, cum laude, at the University of Maryland.
 
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Revision as of 14:51, 8 September 2016

The HCIL has an open, semi-organized weekly "brown bag lunch (BBL)" every Thursdays from 12:30-1:30pm in HCIL (2105 Hornbake, South Wing). The topics range from someone's work, current interests in the HCIL, software demos/reviews, study design, proposed research topics, introductions to new people, etc. The BBL is the one hour a week where we all come together--thus, it’s a unique time for HCIL members with unique opportunities to help build collaborations, increase awareness of each other’s activities, and generally just have a bit of fun together with free food every week. There is no RSVP; simply show up!

If you would like to give or suggest a talk, presentation, workshop, etc., send an email to BBL student co-coordinators Austin Beck (austinbb@umd.edu) or Leyla Norooz (leylan@umd.edu). In the email, briefly describe the topic and preferred dates.

To be notified about upcoming events, please subscribe one of these mailing lists.

We thank YAHOO for its sponsorship of the HCIL Brown Bag Lunches Yahoo.jpg.

Fall 2016 Schedule

Date Leader Topic
09/01/2016

Kickoff to a new Semester!

Come network, make introductions, and share what each of us is working on

Please come to our first BBL of the fall 2016-2017 academic year to introduce yourself and share what you're working on in the coming semester. The first BBL will be for us to network with each other and kickoff a great new semester.

09/08/2016
TBD

CHI Papers Clinic Lunch

Abstract: TBD

Bio: TBD

09/15/2016 Karen Holtzblatt
InContext Design / University of Maryland, College Park

TBD

Abstract: TBD

Bio: TBD

09/22/2016 Elissa Redmiles
HCIL, University of Maryland, College Park

How I Learned to be Secure: a Census-Representative Survey of Security Advice Sources and Behavior

Abstract: Few users have a single, authoritative, source from whom they can request digital-security advice. Rather, digital- security skills are often learned haphazardly, as users filter through an overwhelming quantity of security advice. By understanding the factors that contribute to users' advice sources, beliefs, and security behaviors, we can help to pare down the quantity and improve the quality of advice provided to users, streamlining the process of learning key behaviors. In this work we rigorously investigated how users' security beliefs, knowledge, and demographics correlate with their sources of security advice, and how all these factors influence security behaviors. Using a carefully pre-tested, U.S.-census-representative survey of 526 users, we present an overview of the prevalence of respondents' advice sources, reasons for accepting and rejecting advice from those sources, and the impact of these sources and demographic factors on security behavior. We find evidence of a "digital divide" in security: the advice sources of users with higher skill levels and socioeconomic status dier from those with fewer resources. This digital security divide may add to the vulnerability of already disadvantaged users. We conclude with recommendations for combating the digital divide and improving the efficacy of digital-security advice.

Bio: Elissa Redmiles is a Ph.D. student in Computer Science at the University of Maryland. Her research focuses on usable security - the intersection between Cyber-security and Human Computer Interaction. Elissa was a 2015 Eric and Wendy Schmidt Data Science for Social Good Fellow at the University of Chicago. Prior to pursuing her Ph.D., she held Marketing Management and Software Engineering roles at IBM and completed her B.S. in Computer Science, cum laude, at the University of Maryland.

09/29/2016 Gregg Vanderheiden
Director, Trace R&D Center, University of Maryland, College Park

TBD

Abstract: TBD

Bio: TBD

10/06/2016 John Wilbanks,
Sage Bionetworks

Using Human Centered Design to Make Informed Consent Actually Inform

Abstract: TBD

Bio: TBD

10/13/2016 Fan Du
Catherine Plaisant
HCIL, University of Maryland, College Park

VIS 2016 practice talks

Title: EventAction: Visual Analytics for Temporal Event Sequence Recommendation
Abstract: Recommender systems are being widely used to assist people in making decisions, for example, recommending films to watch or books to buy. Despite its ubiquity, the problem of presenting the recommendations of temporal event sequences has not been studied. We propose EventAction, which to our knowledge, is the first attempt at a prescriptive analytics interface designed to present and explain recommendations of temporal event sequences. EventAction provides a visual analytics approach to (1) identify similar records, (2) explore potential outcomes, (3) review recommended temporal event sequences that might help achieve the users' goals, and (4) interactively assist users as they define a personalized action plan associated with a probability of success. Following the design study framework, we designed and deployed EventAction in the context of student advising and reported on the evaluation with a student review manager and three graduate students.

Title: Coping with Volume and Variety in Temporal Event Sequences: Strategies for Sharpening Analytic Focus
Abstract: The growing volume and variety of data presents both opportunities and challenges for visual analytics. Addressing these challenges is needed for big data to provide valuable insights and novel solutions for business, security, social media, and healthcare. In the case of temporal event sequence analytics it is the number of events in the data and variety of temporal sequence patterns that challenges users of visual analytic tools. This paper describes 15 strategies for sharpening analytic focus that analysts can use to reduce the data volume and pattern variety. Four groups of strategies are proposed: (1) extraction strategies, (2) temporal folding, (3) pattern simplification strategies, and (4) iterative strategies. For each strategy, we provide examples of the use and impact of this strategy on volume and/or variety. Examples are selected from 20 case studies gathered from either our own work, the literature, or based on email interviews with individuals who conducted the analyses and developers who observed analysts using the tools. Finally, we discuss how these strategies might be combined and report on the feedback from 10 senior event sequence analysts.

10/20/2016 TBD

TBD

Abstract: TBD

Bio: TBD

10/27/2016 Greg Walsh,
University of Baltimore

TBD

Abstract: TBD

Bio: TBD

11/03/2016 John Dickerson, Computer Science, University of Maryland, College Park

TBD

Abstract: TBD

Bio: TBD

11/10/2016 Bill Kules, iSchool, University of Maryland, College Park

Presentation about issues of equity, diversity and inclusion into HCI and programming courses

Abstract: TBD

Bio: TBD


11/17/2016 TBD

TBD

Abstract: TBD

Bio: TBD

11/24/2016 No Brown Bag, Thanksgiving Break.
12/01/2016 TBD

TBD

Abstract: TBD

Bio: TBD

12/08/2016 HCIL

HCIL Seasonal Cookie Exchange

'Cookie exchanges involve people making a certain number of cookies (e.g., 6 bags of 6 cookies each) and bringing them in with a card describing the cookies. They all get lined up and then each person can take six bags of whichever types of cookies they want.


Past Brown Bags

View the Past Brown Bag Lunch Schedules to learn more about prior talks.